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{{Template:About fuckingBarney's Colorful World! is Barney's third touring stage show (following Barney's Big Surprise and Barney's Musical Castle). It originally toured in different kinds of countries from 2003-2004. Later, it toured in Mexico in 2007, and in Brazil in 2011. The show was released on VHS and DVD in 2004. Also known as Barney's Colourful World Live in the UK.

Filming Location: Dodge Theatre- Phoenix, Arizona

Plot Edit

Barney takes his friends on a trip around the colorful world. With the help of imagination, they travel on an airplane to the rainforest, Next, they travel on a city bus to the land of ice and snow, Next, they travel on a sailing ship to beach, and Next, they go under the sea. Along the way, they'll meet a dancing monkey, a dancing elephant, a dancing polar bear, tap dancing penguins, a glittering starfish (who is a real "star"), and a giant blue whale.

Cast Edit

Song List Edit

Act 1 Edit

  1. Barney Theme Song
  2. If You're Happy and You Know It
  3. Being Together
  4. Mr. Knickerbocker
  5. The Airplane Song
  6. Jungle Adventure
  7. The Elephant Song
  8. If All the Raindrops
  9. The Wheels on the Bus
  10. It's C-C Cold BRRRR!
  11. Look at Me I'm Dancing!
  12. The Rainbow Song

Act 2 Edit

File:MVC-009F10.jpg
  1. I'd Love to Sail
  2. The Baby Bop Hop
  3. Mister Sun
  4. BINGO
  5. Castles So High
  6. The Duckies Do
  7. If I Lived Under the Sea
  8. Bubbles
  9. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  10. Just Imagine
  11. Colors All Around
  12. I Love You

TriviaEdit

File:Thumbnail-2.aspx.jpeg
  • Rebecca Wilson (who played Kelly in Barney Live! In New York City) was credited as a dancer.
  • This is the only appearances of Donny, Mike, Sarah, and Gina. However, prior to this, Sarah (Tory Green) made her first cameo in the trailer to Come on Over to Barney's House.
  • This is the first major Barney tour to not have any new songs.
  • When the live show was released on video, it was edited with scenes of Season 9's cast members (Stacy, Laura, and Jackson). The beginning was also edited, as the beginning of the original stage show had Barney doll spinning on the idea bench before coming to life. Instead, we see the kids imagine Barney putting on a show, which later immediately cuts to Barney coming through the curtains. In the UK and Asia video releases, three British children prepare for a pretend trip with Barney (a Barney plush toy that could be bought in stores, like in the US version) and imagine going on a trip. One of the kids spins the globe and from there, it transitions to Barney coming through the curtains (much like in the US opening).
  • In the live on stage version of this show, a Barney doll sat on the idea bench before the show started. Right after the overture, the Idea Bench started to spin with a timpani roll, smoke arising from behind it. The spinning became increasingly faster as the bench went farther back. When the costumed Barney came through the curtains, the doll on the bench appeared to vanish. This was achieved with a part of the bench that was separate from the rest of the bench. The Barney doll was actually attached to this platform. This small platform for the doll flipped upside down, the front of the hollow, bottomless seat hiding the doll when the costumed Barney appeared, insuring that the two were never seen at the same time. The top of the Barney doll's head can be seen under the right bench seat in various shots of the home video. The outline of the bottom the platform can be seen on this seat of the bench as well. In addition to the live version this is the only time where we hear a male announcer saying "When we play in the park with Barney, we spin around on the idea bench and use our imaginations. If you want to play with Barney, use your imagination." rather than the "Today's appearance of Barney is made possible by your imagination" announcement.
  • The tour was launched at Radio City Music Hall, again as an homage to Barney's sucess in Barney Live! In New York City.
  • Studio recordings of some of this show's songs were later used on the soundtrack of Let's Go to the Beach.
  • This is the last Barney live show to be released on the US version of home video.
  • This is the only Barney live show to be released on the US DVD.

Gallery Edit

VideosEdit

Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer01:11

Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer

Template:Infobox television

Family Feud is an American television game show created by Mark Goodson. The show features a competition in which two families must name the most popular responses to a survey question posed to 100 people in order to win cash and prizes. The original network version of the show aired on ABC from July 12, 1976 to June 14, 1985, then returned on CBS on July 4, 1988, where it remained until it was canceled on September 10, 1993. The show has also existed in three syndicated versions: the first aired from September 19, 1977 to September 6, 1985; the second aired from September 19, 1988 to September 8, 1995; the third and current version debuted on September 20, 1999.

The ABC network version of the show and the first syndicated series were hosted by Richard Dawson. Ray Combs hosted the CBS series and the first six seasons of the accompanying syndicated version, then was replaced by Dawson for the remainder of the latter show's run. The 1999 syndicated series has been hosted by Louie Anderson (1999–2002), Richard Karn (2002–06), John O'Hurley (2006–10), and Steve Harvey (2010–present). Announcers for the series have included Gene Wood (1976–95), Burton Richardson (1999–2010), and Joey Fatone (2010–present).

The series has spawned multiple regional adaptations in over 50 international markets outside the United States. Within a year of its debut, the original version became the number one game show in daytime television; however, as viewing habits changed, the ratings declined. Harvey's takeover of the 1999 syndicated series increased its Nielsen ratings significantly and eventually placed it among the top five most popular syndicated programs in the country. In 2013, TV Guide ranked Family Feud third in its list of the 60 greatest game shows of all time.

Template:TOC limit

Gameplay

Each episode of Family Feud features ten contestants from two different families competing to win cash and prizes, with five members apiece representing each family. The original version of the show began with the families being introduced, seated opposite each other as if posing for family portraits, after which Dawson would spend approximately five minutes interviewing them.[1]

Each round begins with a toss-up between two opposing players, with the host asking a survey question that was previously posed to a group of 100 people. (Example: "Name the hour that you get up on Sunday mornings.")[2] A certain number of answers are concealed on the board, starting with the most popular. Only answers that receive two or more responses can appear on the board.  The first player to buzz in gives an answer; if it is the most popular, his/her family immediately wins the toss-up. Otherwise, the opponent responds as well and the higher-ranked answer wins. Ties are broken in favor of the player who buzzes in first. If neither player's answer is on the board, the other eight players have a chance to respond, one at a time from alternating sides, until an answer is found. The family that wins the toss-up may choose to play the question or pass control to their opponents.[2]

The family with control of the question now tries to win the round by guessing all of the remaining concealed answers, with each member giving one answer in sequence. Giving an answer not on the board, or failing to respond within the allotted time, earns one strike. If the family earns three strikes, their opponents are given one chance to steal the points for the round by guessing any still-concealed answer; failing to do so awards the points to the family that originally had control.[2]

Answers are worth one point for every person in the 100-member survey who gave them. The winning family in each round scores the total points for all revealed answers to that question, including those given during the toss-up but excluding the one used to steal (if applicable). The number of answers on the board decreases from round to round, and certain rounds are played for double or triple value. The first family to score 300 (originally 200 when the show debuted) or more points wins the game and advances to the Fast Money bonus round for a chance to win a cash prize of $20,000 (originally $5,000 on the daytime version, then $10,000 in syndication before 2001, when the prize was raised to $20,000). Until 1992, both teams received $1 per point scored.[1]

Fast Money

The winning family selects two of its members to play this round. The first member has 20 seconds (originally 15) to answer five survey questions, with the second member sequestered backstage so that he/she cannot see or hear the answers. After the point values are revealed and totaled, the board is cleared and the second member is given 25 seconds (originally 20) to answer the same five questions. If this member duplicates a previously given answer, he/she is allowed to give a different one. Either player may pass on a question and return to it after all five have been asked, if there is still time on the clock. If the two members accumulate 200 points or more between them, the family wins the grand prize; otherwise, they receive $5 per point.[2]

Hosts and announcers

The ABC and first syndicated versions of Family Feud were hosted by Richard Dawson. As writer David Marc put it, Dawson's on-air personality "fell somewhere between the brainless sincerity of Wink Martindale and the raunchy cynicism of Chuck Barris".[3] Dawson showed himself to have insistent affections for all of the female members of each family that competed on the show, regardless of age.[3] Writers Tim Brooks, Jon Ellowitz, and Earle F. Marsh owed Family Feud's popularity to Dawson's "glib familiarity" (he had previously played Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes) and "ready wit".[1] The show's original announcer was Gene Wood,[4] with Johnny Gilbert and Rod Roddy serving as occasional substitutes.[5]

In 1988, Ray Combs took over Dawson's role as host on CBS and in syndication; Wood again served as announcer, with Roddy, Art James, and Charlie O'Donnell serving in that role when Wood was not available.[5] The CBS version was canceled in 1993; also that year, after the syndicated show had struggled in the ratings for some time and was being threatened with cancellation by local stations, the production company decided to offer Dawson a chance to return to Feud, which he did for the 1994–95 season;[6] Dawson's return, however, did nothing to increase the syndicated series' ratings, as the show was ultimately canceled. After this, Dawson decided to have no further involvement with the show.

When Feud returned to syndication in 1999, it was initially hosted by Louie Anderson,[1] while Burton Richardson took over as the new announcer.[7] Richard Karn was selected to take over for Anderson when season four premiered in 2002,[1] and when season eight premiered in 2006, Karn was replaced, likewise, by John O'Hurley.[1] In 2010, both O'Hurley and Richardson departed from the show; comedian Steve Harvey was named the new host for season twelve,[8] and a pre-recorded track of former 'N Sync member Joey Fatone's voice has been used as the "announcer" since then.[9]

Production

The first four versions of the show were directed by Paul Alter and produced by Howard Felsher and Cathy Dawson. For the 1988 versions, Gary Dawson worked with the show as a third producer, and Alter was joined by two other directors, Marc Breslow and Andy Felsher.[5] The 1999 version's main staff include executive producer Gabrielle Johnston, supervising producers Kristin Bjorklund and Brian Hawley, and director Ken Fuchs; Johnston and Bjorklund previously worked as associate producers of the 1980s version.[10] The show's classic theme tune was written by an uncredited Walt Levinsky for Score Productions, and the current version's theme was written by John Lewis Parker.[10] The production rights to the show were originally owned by the production company Goodson shared with his partner Bill Todman, but were sold to their current holder, FremantleMedia, when it acquired all of Goodson and Todman's works in 2002.[10]

Broadcast history

Mark Goodson created Family Feud during the increasing popularity of his earlier game show Match Game, which set daytime ratings records in 1976, and on which Dawson had previously appeared as one of its most popular panelists. The show premiered on ABC's daytime lineup on July 12, 1976, and although it was not an immediate hit, before long it became a ratings winner and eventually surpassed Match Game to become the No. 1 game show in daytime.[11] It remained the most popular daytime game show until Merv Griffin's game show Wheel of Fortune surpassed it in 1984.[2] ABC periodically broadcast primetime specials based on Feud, in which celebrity casts from various TV series competed instead of ordinary families.[1] The popularity of the daytime series inspired Goodson to consider producing a nighttime edition, which launched on September 18, 1977. Like many other game shows at the time, the nighttime Feud aired once a week; it expanded to twice a week in January 1979.,[2] and finally to five nights a week (Monday through Friday) in the fall of 1980.

However, the viewing habits of both daytime and syndicated audiences were changing.[2] When Griffin launched WheelTemplate:'s syndicated version, starring Pat Sajak and Vanna White, in 1983, that show climbed the ratings to the point where it unseated Feud as the highest-rated syndicated show;[12] the syndicated revival of Wheel's sister show Jeopardy! with Alex Trebek as host also siphoned ratings from Feud with its early success. ABC decided that it would not renew Feud for the 1985–86 season, and a cancellation notice was issued for the syndicated version as well. The network version was canceled on June 14, 1985,[2] and the syndicated series was brought to an end in September of that same year.[2]

Three years after the original version ended, Family Feud returned to CBS on July 4, 1988, while an accompanying syndicated version debuted in the fall of that year, with both versions now hosted by Combs.[1] In June 1992, the network version expanded from its original half-hour format to a full hour, and was retitled The Family Feud Challenge;[1] this new format featured three families per episode, which included two new families competing in the first half-hour for the right to play the returning champions in the second half. The Family Feud Challenge aired its final new episode on March 26, 1993, with reruns airing until September 10.[13] Meanwhile, the syndicated Feud was struggling in the ratings and Goodson was beginning to deal with an increasing number of cancellation threats from local stations.[6] The producers believed that reinstating Dawson, with whom Goodson had clashed during the run of the previous series, would resolve the ratings issues;[6] but it did not, and the syndicated Feud was finally canceled at the end of the 1994–95 season.

After a four-year hiatus, Family Feud returned in syndication on September 20, 1999.[14] After Karn took over the show, the format was changed to reintroduce returning champions, allowing them to appear for up to five days. However, even after Karn's takeover, Anderson-hosted episodes continued in reruns that aired on PAX Network.[1] In O'Hurley's later days, the show's Nielsen ratings were at 1.5 (putting it in danger of cancellation), but when Harvey took over, ratings increased by as much as 40%,[15] and within two short years, the show was rated at 4.0, and had become the fifth most popular syndicated program.[16] During the Harvey era, Family Feud regularly ranks in the top 10 highest rated programs in all of daytime television programming and third among game shows (behind Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy!); in February 2014, the show achieved a 6.0 share in the Nielsen ratings, with approximately 8.8 million viewers.[17]  In June 2015, Family Feud eclipsed Wheel of Fortune as the most-watched syndicated game show on television, for the first time since 1983, when Dawson was hosting the original nighttime syndicated edition.[18]

Reruns of the Dawson, Combs, Anderson, Karn and O'Hurley hosted episodes will be included in Buzzr TV's lineup upon its launch on May 31, 2015.[19]

The popularity of Family Feud in the United States has led it to become a worldwide franchise, with over 50 adaptations outside the United States. Countries that have aired their own versions of the show include Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and Vietnam, among others.

Reception

The original version of Family Feud won the Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show in 1977, and Dawson won the 1978 Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Game Show Host. Much later, in 2014, Harvey won the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Game Show Host for hosting Feud.[20] Feud ranked number 3 on Game Show Network (GSN)'s 2006 list of the 50 Greatest Game Shows of All Time,[21] and also on TV Guide's 2013 list of the 60 greatest game shows ever.[22]

Tara Ariano and Sarah D. Bunting, founders of the website Television Without Pity, wrote that they hated the 1999 syndicated series, saying "Give us classic Feud every time", citing both the Dawson and Combs eras; additionally, they called Anderson an "alleged sexual harasser and full-time sphere".[23]

Merchandise

Since the show's premiere in 1976, many home versions of Family Feud have been released in various formats. Milton Bradley, Pressman Games, and Endless Games have all released traditional board games based on the show,[24][25] while Imagination Entertainment released the series in a DVD game format.[26]

The game has been released in other formats by multiple companies; Coleco Adam released the first computer version of the show in 1983, and Sharedata followed in 1987 with versions for MS-DOS, Commodore 64, and Apple II computers.[27] GameTek released versions for NES, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis, Panasonic 3DO, and PC (on CD-ROM) between 1990 and 1995.[28] Hasbro Interactive released a version in 2000 for the PC and PlayStation.[29] In 2006, versions were released for PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance, and PC.[30] Seattle-based Mobliss Inc. also released a mobile version of Family Feud that was available on Sprint, Verizon, and Cingular.[31][32][33] Glu Mobile later released a newer mobile version of Family Feud for other carriers.[34]

Most recently, in conjunction with Ludia, Ubisoft has released multiple versions of the series. The first of these was entitled Family Feud: 2010 Edition and was released for the Wii, Nintendo DS, and PC in September 2009.[35] Ubisoft then released Family Feud Decades the next year, which features sets and survey questions from television versions from all four decades the show has been on air.[36] A third game, entitled Family Feud: 2012 Edition was released for the Wii and Xbox 360 in 2011.[37]

In addition to the home games, a DVD set titled All-Star Family Feud was released on January 8, 2008 and featured a total of 15 celebrity episodes from the original ABC/syndicated versions on its four discs.[38] It was re-issued as The Best of All-Star Family Feud on February 2, 2010.[39]

References

Works cited

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External links

Template:S-start Template:Succession box Template:S-end Template:Family Feud Template:Daytime Emmy Award Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show 1974–1983

Series Name
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Use dmy dates|date=December 2011}}

Template:Infobox television Tweenies is a British children's television programme, originally broadcast on the BBC's CBBC programming block. Episodes of the programme have also been repeated on the CBeebies channel since 2002.

Overview and historyEdit

The idea for the programme came from Iain Lauchlan and Will Brenton, a pair with a track record of being involved in BBC children's programming. Together with Karl Woolley and Helen Cadwallader they set up Tell-Tale Productions at Elstree Film Studios in Hertfordshire. Iain Lauchlan was a presenter on Play School, Fingermouse and Playdays, meeting Brenton, a director, writer and also a presenter, during the latter. Together they started producing two of the Playdays strands before forming their own production companies Tell-Tale Productions and, more recently, Wish Films. They also created The Fun Song Factory, Boo!, BB3B, Jim Jam and Sunny, Basil Hair The Squirrel and Entertainment Right's The Magical Lives of Toys.

Tweenies is a production of Tell-Tale Productions in association with the BBC. Animation for the show was produced by A Productions, an animation studio based in Bristol, England, with Ealing Animation providing some animation in a few early episodes. Computer animation for the series was provided by Clockwork Digital, with Ben Mars animating Mungo, the computer creature who appears in some later episodes.

The program is no longer in production, although merchandise can still be bought from retailers, and DVDs of the programme are also available.

The characters are well developed and children are able to predict what their responses might be. The mixture of story, song and creative activity provides excellent opportunities for children to learn through play. Music plays an important part in the programme and children are encouraged to join in with songs and actions.

The programme is set in a playschool attended by the four Tweenies themselves: Bella, Milo, Fizz and the youngest, Jake.  They are in the care of two adults, Max and Judy, and two dogs - Doodles & Izzles.

The show includes a "Tweenie Clock", with five circular lights arranged in a pentagonal shape with the lights denoting "News Time" (Circle Time in USA) - Orange, "Messy Time" - Blue, "Song Time" - Yellow, "Telly Time" (Video Time in USA) - Green and "Story Time" - Red. "Surprise Time" is a special time determined when all five lights glow. A button at the centre of the clock (Purple) is pressed to select the activity that will be undertaken next.

It is currently being shown on CBeebies, the BBC's channel for young children. Like a number of other CBeebies programmes, a live stage version of the show has toured in the UK. The most recent tour, Top of the Tots, toured the British Isles during 2009, the series' 10th anniversary. In addition, the tour also played several shows in Hong Kong in late September and early October 2009. The Tweenies are also regulars on the annual CBeebies Live tours around the British Isles. Between 2003 and 2005, there was also a live version of Tweenies shown regularly at Alton Towers in the Cred Street section aimed at younger children, which was removed in favour of Bob the Builder. In 2000, Tweenies won two awards: Best PreSchool Educational Program and Best Live Action PreSchool Programme.

The original prototypes for the Tweenies characters were designed by Sally Preisig of Mimics Productions; they were later re-scaled into two sizes for the characters shown on the series. In addition, Preisig also designed the character costumes and was co-constructor/developer for the Tweenies' full-size puppets. The costume fabric comes from the UK and was imported and dyed into their present colours; it is about the same thickness as fleece jumpers.

On 20 January 2013, the programme caused controversy after the 2001 episode titled "Favourite Songs",[1] featuring a skit of Max dressed and acting like BBC personality Jimmy Savile, (who after his death was implicated for sex and abuse crimes against children and teens on BBC grounds), was broadcast on CBeebies at 8:40 am.[2] The BBC announced that "Favourite Songs" would permanently be removed from rotation and published an apology.[3] Due to this incident The Tweenies was aired on CBeebies for a further week and then taken off air. The final episode to air was the 264th, titled "Digger", on 1 February 2013. The series returned on 3 June 2013, resuming with the 261st episode, "No".[4]

CharactersEdit

The Tweenies consist of Bella, Milo, Fizz, Jake, Doodles, Izzles, Max, Judy, and are sometimes joined by Max's sister Polly. Other characters have appeared occasionally, including Milo's Uncle Mickey, Jake's mother, Fizz's father and Bella's Granny. There have also been several animated characters.

All of the four main characters appeared in the  first episode Tweenie Band, which was filmed in 1998 at Elstree Studios & aired on 6 September 1999.

The Tweenies are played by one set of actors, while the voices are provided by other actors. Unless otherwise indicated, all of the following actors and voice talent were in the show from 1999.

Cast Edit

Original UK cast
Character Description Actor Voice/Animatronics
The Children
Bella Blue-skinned with yellow hair which is usually accompanied with a red hair ribbon. She has a very bossy attitude and likes her own way. Sometimes she causes things to go wrong  — the tallest Tweenie[5] Tamsin Heatley Sally Preisig (1999–2000)
Emma Weaver (2000–2003)
Fizz She is yellow-skinned with brown hair, sometimes shy.  Fizz's best friend is Bella. Her favourite colour is pink, Loves doing ballet, dressing up as a princess and playing with the dolls. Jenny Hutchinson (1999–2000)
Angela Reynolds (2000)
Francesca Anderson (2001–2003)
Coleen Daley
Jake Oranged-skinned with a yellow mohican - the youngest and shortest Tweenie.  Jake sometimes shows signs of being homesick. He often gets words mixed up. Jake's best friend is Milo. Samantha Dodd (1999–2003) Justin Fletcher
Milo Purple-skinned with black hair. He is energetic and boisterous, but friendly and cheerful. Milo sometimes says stuff he shouldn't have said and can blow a huff when annoyed and then be told off by Bella. C.H. Beck Bob Golding
The Adults
Judy Pale green-skinned with purple hair, full name Judy, originated from Ireland. Simon Grover Sinead Rushe
Max Dark pink-skinned, with white hair, full name Max. Simon Grover Bob Golding
The Dogs
Doodles A red and yellow male dog. Alan Riley Justin Fletcher
Izzles A purple and white female dog, who was first introduced to the Tweenies in 2001, as Doodles' new friend. Fiona Watkins Colleen Daley

AlbumsEdit

Data from AllMusicCharts.com

Title Entered Chart (UK) Peak Position (UK) Weeks on Chart (UK)
Friends Forever 25 November 2000 56 4
The Christmas Album 1 December 2001 34 5
Everybody Dance -- -- --
Greatest Hits
(double CD)
-- -- --

SinglesEdit

Data from AllMusicCharts.com

Title Entered chart (UK) Peak position (UK) Weeks on Chart (UK) Sent to CBeebies Album
No. 1 11 November 2000 5 23 Yes
Best Friends Forever 31 March 2001 12 10 Yes
Do the Lollipop 4 August 2001 17 8 No
I Believe in Christmas 15 December 2001 9 6 No
Have Fun, Go Mad

14 September 2002 20 7 Yes

BroadcastEdit

Template:Prose

  • Noggin (USA) - 7 April 2003 – 10 April 2006
  • CBeebies (UK) - 11 February 2002 – 1 February 2013, 3 June 2013–present
  • Living - 24 May 2001 – 10 February 2007
  • CBBC (UK) - 6 September 1999 – 10 February 2002

DVDs & VideosEdit

These were released by BBC Worldwide and some various DVD's are still available in retailers. Template:Col-start | valign="top" style="width:50%;" |

  • "Are you ready to play?" (1999 VHS also for PC-CDROM)
  • Song Time! (1999, VHS)
  • Merry Tweenie Christmas (2000, first DVD)
  • Party Games, Laughs & Giggles (2001)
  • Song Time is Fab-a-Rooney (2001 VHS)
Series Name
Season 16, Episode 14
[[Image:
Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer01:11

Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer

|center|284px]]
Air date November 20, 1996
Written by Mark S. Brenthal
Directed by Steven Feldman
Episode Guide
previous
Let's Go To tHE 4th to July if Barney!
next
Once Upon A Time (video)
  • The Enchanted Toyshop (2002 VHS)
  • Song Time 2 (2000)
  • Songs & Surprises (2001)
  • Tweenies Live! (2000)
  • Animal Friends (1999)
  • Colours are Magic (2000)
  • It's Messy Time (2001 also for PC-CDROM)
  • Everybody Panto (2001)
  • Doodles' New Friend (2002)

| valign="top" style="width:50%;" |

  • Tweenies Live!: The Christmas Present (2002)
  • Night-Time Magic (2002)
  • Animal Friends/Party Games, Laughs & Giggles (2002 DVD)
  • Music is Pop-a-Rooney! (2001 TOTPS)
  • Let's Play (2003 VHS)
  • Jungle Adventure (2004)
  • Let's All Make Music (2004)
  • Fizz! (2005, final VHS)
  • It's Christmas (2005)
  • Song Time: The Complete Collection (2006)
  • The Ultimate Christmas Collection (2006)
  • Messy Time Magic (2008)
  • Practical Jokes (2009)

|} Many of the above videos have also been dubbed into other languages. In addition, several of the Tweenies videos were produced in special versions for retailers with additional footage (for example, the "Party Games, Laughs & Giggles" video distributed at Marks & Spencer stores carried 2 additional segments, adding 10 minutes to the video's running time). Many of the above videos were also released as DVDs under different names. iTunes has released a Best of Tweenies volume 1 which consists of the first 6 episodes of the series.Template:Citation needed

BooksEdit

From 1999 until 2006, various books were released from the Tweenies, based on the episodes that were mostly aired. There were also annuals that were released from 2001–06 and other books, based on each character from the Tweenies.

Toys & GamesEdit

From 1999 until 2007, the Tweenies were more popular than they are today and many toys were sold in various retailers, such as Toys "R" Us, Argos & Woolworths. There were many toys & games, such as soft toys, playsets, collectable figures, board games, jigsaws & puzzles, talking toys, video games and many others.

AwardsEdit

  • Nominated and won Best Pre-School Live Action (2000) [6]

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

Template:Authority control

Barney's Colorful World! is Barney's third touring stage show (following Barney's Big Surprise and Barney's Musical Castle). It originally toured in kinds of countries from 2003-2004. Later, it toured in Mexico in 2007, and in Brazil in 2011. The show was released on VHS and DVD in 2004. Also known as Barney's Colourful World Live in the UK.

Filming Location: Dodge Theatre- Phoenix, Arizona

Plot Edit

Barney takes his friends on a trip to the far reaches of the world. With the help of imagination, they travel on an airplane to the rainforest, next, they travel on a city bus to the Arctic, next they travel on a sailing ship to beach, and next, they go under the sea. Along the way, they'll meet toe-tappin' penguins, a dancing polar bear, a glittering starfish (who is a real "star"), and a giant blue whale.

Cast Edit

Song List Edit

Act 1 Edit

  1. Barney Theme Song
    File:MVC-009F10.jpg
  2. If You're Happy and You Know It
  3. Being Together
  4. Mr. Knickerbocker
  5. The Airplane Song
  6. Jungle Adventure
  7. The Elephant Song
  8. If All the Raindrops
  9. The Wheels on the Bus
  10. It's C-C Cold BRRRR!
  11. Look at Me I'm Dancing!
  12. The Rainbow Song

Act 2 Edit

  1. I'd Love to Sail
  2. The Baby Bop Hop
  3. Mister Sun
  4. BINGO
  5. Castles So High
  6. The Duckies Do
  7. If I Lived Under the Sea
  8. Bubbles
  9. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
  10. Just Imagine
  11. Colors All Around
  12. I Love You

TriviaEdit

  • This was the first national tour to feature Dean Wendt as the voice of Barney.
    File:Thumbnail-2.aspx.jpeg
  • Rebecca Wilson (who played Kelly in Barney Live! In New York City) was credited as a dancer.
  • This is the only appearances of Donny, Mike, Sarah, and Gina. However, prior to this, Sarah (Tory Green) made her first cameo in the trailer to Come on Over to Barney's House.
  • This is the first major Barney tour to not have any new songs.
  • When the live show was released on video, it was edited with scenes of Season 9's cast members (Stacy, Laura, and Jackson). The beginning was also edited, as the beginning of the original stage show had Barney doll spinning on the idea bench before coming to life. Instead, we see the kids imagine Barney putting on a show, which later immediately cuts to Barney coming through the curtains. In the UK and Asia video releases, three British children prepare for a pretend trip with Barney (a Barney plush toy that could be bought in stores, like in the US version) and imagine going on a trip. One of the kids spins the globe and from there, it transitions to Barney coming through the curtains (much like in the US opening).
  • In the live on stage version of this show, a Barney doll sat on the idea bench before
    File:Screen shot 2011-03-19 at 10.29.22 PM.png
    the show started. Right after the overture, the Idea Bench started to spin with a timpani roll, smoke arising from behind it. The spinning became increasingly faster as the bench went farther back. When the costumed Barney came through the curtains, the doll on the bench appeared to vanish. This was achieved with a part of the bench that was separate from the rest of the bench. The Barney doll was actually attached to this platform. This small platform for the doll flipped upside down, the front of the hollow, bottomless seat hiding the doll when the costumed Barney appeared, insuring that the two were never seen at the same time. The top of the Barney doll's head can be seen under the right bench seat in various shots of the home video. The outline of the bottom the platform can be seen on this seat of the bench as well. In addition to the live version this is the only time where we hear a male announcer saying "When we play in the park with Barney, we spin around on the idea bench and use our imaginations. If you want to play with Barney, use your imagination." rather than the "Today's appearance of Barney is made possible by your imagination" announcement.
  • On live with Regis and Kelly, When Barney guest stared, he was talking about what was going to happen in this show.
File:BCWplushdoll.jpg
  • The tour was launched at Radio City Musical, again as an homage to Barney's sucess in Barney Live! In New York City.
  • Some songs from the concert was later used in the soundtrack of Let's Go to the Beach (soundtrack).
  • This home video of this live show aired on PBS.
  • This is the last Barney live show to be released on home video.

VideosEdit

Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer01:11

Barney's Colorful World Live! (2004) - Home Video Trailer

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